that that is is. @hillarybliss
Install Theme
me today

me today

(Source: madlangbayan, via ntrnts)

Shot a video with my brother for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation this weekend.

Shot a video with my brother for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation this weekend.


no-thanks: James Hoff

no-thanks: James Hoff

(via nopenope)

theparisreview:

Fred Wiseman has been my idol for a long time. In the 1970s it wasn’t all that easy to see his films. For a while I had seen only Basic Training (1971) and High School (1968). Nothing else. Titicut Follies (1967) was almost impossible to see because it was under a court injunction. Videocassettes had been introduced, but Wiseman’s films existed only on 16mm—ready to be slapped onto a projector or viewed on a flatbed. Until very recently, he was reluctant to transfer his films to DVD. I believe it was because that would have made them too easy to be seen.
When I was editing my first film, I visited Fred Wiseman in Boston. His offices in those days were on Lewis Wharf, and he very kindly allowed me to watch several of his films on a Steenbeck editing machine. At dinner in his home, one of his sons asked him whether he was going to show me “the two-hour, the three-hour, or the four-hour boring film.” Fred didn’t smile. But honestly, I had no problem with the length. For me, they could have been even longer.
I saw Fred again at the London Film Festival in 1978. He was showing Sinai Field Mission. My future wife, Julia Sheehan, and I went to the first screening at the National Film Theatre. Julia, also a Wiseman fan, had just gotten off an all-night flight from Boston, and promptly fell asleep next to Fred. She was mortified. I remember being mesmerized by the film and its “language.”
The cinder block buildings, the microwave dishes, and the injunction: to stop sunbathing on the modules. If Surrealist painters had to conjure an empty, featureless plain with pieces of driftwood, Wiseman was able to do away with the driftwood, the conjuring, and simply point the camera at reality. The results are disarming and even dismaying.
—Errol Morris on Frederick Wiseman and the “Tawdry Gruesomeness of Reality”
Image from Sinai Field Mission

theparisreview:

Fred Wiseman has been my idol for a long time. In the 1970s it wasn’t all that easy to see his films. For a while I had seen only Basic Training (1971) and High School (1968). Nothing else. Titicut Follies (1967) was almost impossible to see because it was under a court injunction. Videocassettes had been introduced, but Wiseman’s films existed only on 16mm—ready to be slapped onto a projector or viewed on a flatbed. Until very recently, he was reluctant to transfer his films to DVD. I believe it was because that would have made them too easy to be seen.

When I was editing my first film, I visited Fred Wiseman in Boston. His offices in those days were on Lewis Wharf, and he very kindly allowed me to watch several of his films on a Steenbeck editing machine. At dinner in his home, one of his sons asked him whether he was going to show me “the two-hour, the three-hour, or the four-hour boring film.” Fred didn’t smile. But honestly, I had no problem with the length. For me, they could have been even longer.

I saw Fred again at the London Film Festival in 1978. He was showing Sinai Field Mission. My future wife, Julia Sheehan, and I went to the first screening at the National Film Theatre. Julia, also a Wiseman fan, had just gotten off an all-night flight from Boston, and promptly fell asleep next to Fred. She was mortified. I remember being mesmerized by the film and its “language.”

The cinder block buildings, the microwave dishes, and the injunction: to stop sunbathing on the modules. If Surrealist painters had to conjure an empty, featureless plain with pieces of driftwood, Wiseman was able to do away with the driftwood, the conjuring, and simply point the camera at reality. The results are disarming and even dismaying.

Errol Morris on Frederick Wiseman and the “Tawdry Gruesomeness of Reality”

Image from Sinai Field Mission

Leviathon by Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor

CAN’T WAAAAAAAAAAAAAITTTT

nobodysdiary:

Ruby Sky Stiler, no title (wall relief, horizontal pattern), 2011 Foam, acrylic resin, polymer adhesive, spray paint, 25 x 20 cm / 10 x 8 in, Courtesy Private Collection, New York on view beginning Thursday, September 20th at Lukas Feichtner Gallery in Vienna in The Petrified River, curated by David Harper and Martha Kirszenbaum

nobodysdiary:

Ruby Sky Stiler, no title (wall relief, horizontal pattern), 2011 Foam, acrylic resin, polymer adhesive, spray paint, 25 x 20 cm / 10 x 8 in, Courtesy Private Collection, New York on view beginning Thursday, September 20th at Lukas Feichtner Gallery in Vienna in The Petrified River, curated by David Harper and Martha Kirszenbaum

(Source: nobodysdiary)

Glass, Bert Haanstra, 1958

At Sea, 2007, Peter Hutton, 16mm
obsessed

At Sea, 2007, Peter Hutton, 16mm

obsessed

At Sea, 16mm, 2007, Peter Hutton
hutton perfection at union docs last night

At Sea, 16mm, 2007, Peter Hutton

hutton perfection at union docs last night

rachelmalin:

joseph bueys vs abraham david christian at documenta 5

rachelmalin:

joseph bueys vs abraham david christian at documenta 5

jessicaeaton:

••• RGB, 2012

jessicaeaton:

••• RGB, 2012

i miss california
smelliott

i miss california

smelliott

artruby:

Yayoi Kusama in Louis Vuitton windows at midtown. Photo: Art Ruby. 

artruby:

Yayoi Kusama in Louis Vuitton windows at midtown. Photo: Art Ruby. 

(Source: artruby)

Gianni Colombo, Spazio Elastico, 1968-69
Cramming as much art as possible into this last week before school. Loved Ghosts in the Machine at The New Museum.

Gianni Colombo, Spazio Elastico, 1968-69

Cramming as much art as possible into this last week before school. Loved Ghosts in the Machine at The New Museum.

kingstitt:

Mark Rothko’s 1961 exhibit at Whitechapel Gallery 

kingstitt:

Mark Rothko’s 1961 exhibit at Whitechapel Gallery